Quinoa, Orach Harvest

What do quinoa and orach have in common? Along with being planted in large patches by me this year, they are both members of the Chenopod (Chenopodiaceae) family. They also both are beautiful, adding striking swaths of color to the garden.

Another thing they had in common is that I recently harvested both of them from my garden for seed.

Quinoa heads

“Brightest Brilliant” quinoa delivers yellow, orange and red seed heads. Purple orach stands behind it.

I planted purple orach and Brightest Brilliant quinoa. It was a two-year plan. Last year I had small quantities of the seed, and wanted more, so I planted both and saved their seed. This year, I could plant a miniature field of them. Felt like I was back on the farm.

When I realized that both plants were part of the same family, I understood better why I was so attracted to them. The Chenopods also include two of my other favorite garden veggies, beets and chard, which also provide striking reds and oranges to the vegetable garden.

I’ve always connected orach with a third Chenopod, spinach. In fact, orach is sometimes called “mountain spinach.” Orach delivers smooth, thick leaves on a long stalk. We plant thickly, then thin the plantings and strip the leaves off the stems. It seems best for salad when the leaves are still young and tender, but the older, larger leaves can be enjoyed if lightly steamed.

It surprised me to find that quinoa is also part of this clan. To my knowledge, it’s the only family member whose seed is part of the plant that we consume. I don’t know about you, but I’m not interested in gnawing on a mouthful of spiky, tough beet seeds.

Quinoa’s small, round seed puffs up nicely in hot water to make a pleasant light grain that can be the base of a salad or used in a pilaf-type dish. It pops softly between the teeth. It takes quite a bit to include in a meal — at least a half-cup of seed — so my goal this year was to grow enough to do that.

Drying seeds

Quinoa and orach plants are cut and hung on an improvised drying rack. A sheet beneath will catch the drying seed.

I haven’t yet stripped the seed off the drying quinoa plants. I have a hunch that it’s going to be a challenging job to clean the crop, and I’ve read that it is a bitter seed unless repeatedly washed.

But we did eat a lot of orach this summer, and have enough seed to cover the “back 40” next year. That’s probably the case with the quinoa too. And as beautiful as the two were together, I can always just replant them for the color.

Hummingbird, Meet Broccoli

This is exactly why you let the purple sprouting broccoli go to flower.

hummingbird

Hummingbird

hummingbird

hummingbird

hummingbird

hummingbird

hummingbird

hummingbird

This is an Anna’s hummingbird (Calypte anna), one of the most common (and yet, not at all “common”) hummingbirds in the Pacific Northwest. I’ve seen them in my garden year-round.

“No larger than a ping-pong ball and no heavier than a nickel,” says the uber-informative All About Birds, the website of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

They share more fascinating hummingbird facts:

  • Mostly green and grey, the male’s “gorget,” or throat patch, can shine with iridescent pink colors in the right sunlight. The color can extend over the bird’s entire head.
  • The males have a characteristic small white spot behind the eye.
  • During mating season, the males have a “dive display” in which they rise to 130 feet, then plummet down in a matter of seconds, stopping to hover a few feet in front of the object of their display.
  • Sometimes a bee or wasp will get impaled on the sharp beak of the bird, causing it to starve to death.
  • Their normal body temperature is about 107 degrees, but when it’s cold, they can go into “torpor” where their breathing and heart rate slows, and their temperature drops to 48.
  • They have tiny legs and can’t really walk or hop, but they can sort of scoot sideways when perched.

 

Why Broccoli Didn’t Flower

Recently, a gardener asked our Master Gardener clinic why their broccoli didn’t flower. That question comes up regularly, and I’ve studied it in my own garden, with my own successes and failures.

Someone also asked me the other day if it was too late to plant winter brassicas.

Finally, I want to share a tip about what to do with your Brussels sprouts plants this time of year.

So I’ll tackle three brassica topics in this post. Here we go.

Why broccoli didn’t flower

If your spring- or summer-planted broccoli didn’t set its flower buds (the part we eat), it could be due to  planting at the wrong time, uneven watering, fertilization issues, planting bad starts or bad treatment of seeds or seedlings.

For summer harvest broccoli, timing is tricky, because you want to plant earlier in spring so you get the crop before the summer heat, but if you plant too early, the broccoli won’t get a robust start. If you plant too late, the heat stresses it. I’ve had best success when planting starts in early to mid-May (or doing a succession of plantings through May). That means you’ll be cutting heads in mid-July and into August.

In my experience, they like a lot of compost, which also helps to regulate moisture. So I put them in a well-composted bed, and add a top-dressing a few weeks after planting. I’ll feed once with a balanced complete organic fertilizer, about a month after planting.

Fertilizing with a lot of nitrogen as they’re trying to form heads could prevent the plant from flowering, and probably just produce more leaves.

For overwintering broccoli like purple sprouting (my favorite), I start the seeds in late May/early June, then plant them out in August. Also tricky to keep them consistently watered during that seedling stage. I top-dress with compost in mid-September, then lay a bed of straw mulch over the soil for the winter. They’ll send up a small central head by early March, followed by sprouts.

I don’t grow fall-harvest broccoli often, but I believe that it’s on the same planting and transplanting schedule as sprouting broccoli, but will produce heads in late September. I found the harvest to be small, so now I just concentrate on the sprouting ones.

Brussels sprouts ‘tip’

On to the Brussels sprouts. If you have winter harvest sprouts in the garden now, you’ve probably noticed small sprouts forming along the leaf axils. Also, you’ll probably see a denser set of leaves forming like at the top of the plant. If you cut off that growing tip, the sprouts should develop faster and more robustly. That’s because the plant is now putting all its energy into the sprouts rather than the new leaves.

Here are photos showing this cut on one of my plants:

Brussels sprout topBrussels sprout top cut

Planting brassicas now?

One final note about whether you could be planting brassicas now. The answer is, not really.Most brassicas should be planted in May and June, and transplanted in August, or at the latest in early September.

However! If you can find healthy kale plants still in the nurseries, you could put them in, but I would not expect much production from them over the fall and winter.

Think Purple for Winter – Plant Broccoli Now

Purple Sprouting broccoli (my favorite winter vegetable) takes an incredibly long time to mature. A reader comment prompted me to think again about this amazing biennial plant.

PS-Broccoli1

Annual broccoli planted in spring or summer can produce in as little as 65 days, but Purple Sprouting needs to get started during the heat of the summer and size up a bit before fall. If started by mid-July, you should have plants that are knee-high before the days get so short and cool that growth grinds to a halt. But in late winter they’ll take off again and start pumping out the purple in very early spring (February) on plants that can be waist-high.

First you’ll get a small central head, and after you cut that, numerous shoots will appear from the axillary buds at the base of the leaves. PS-Broccoli2Cut when 6 to 10 inches long and look for more to appear. I can often get a half-dozen meals out of one plant, and the harvest time can stretch over three months.

Compared to summer or fall broccoli, Purple Sprouting is an all-star producer, and well worth the wait.

Growing tips:

A note on the cabbage butterfly:

Actually called the imported cabbage worm (Pieris rapae), this is the common white butterfly with black wing dots that jerkily careens around our gardens. It is looking for plants of the Brassica genus.

This pest lays its eggs (tiny white or yellow groups of them) on the underside of the leaves. When they hatch, the larvae (a tiny green worm) feed on the leaves. Their feeding can destroy a young plant,

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so I keep the floating row cover on until the plant is large enough to defend itself.

Another nice thing about winter gardening: this pest is much less prevalent. I rarely see them after about early October.

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