Harvest Visit to UW Farm

Biking by the UW Farm on University of Washington’s east campus this week, I was drawn by a glorious field of colorful chard, so I decided to stop and take a little tour.

UW Farm is a teaching space, and it includes not only UW students but other programs, such as Seattle Youth Garden Works, a program for youth to learn entrepreneurial skills as well as the techniques of growing food.

Here are some harvest images of my visit to the farm.

field of chard

Bright Lights chard, in a glorious field.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes growing the Italian style, trained along a single cord coming from overhead. Productive!

Tomatoes pruned to two stems

The tomatoes are pruned to two main stems, which are then trained and tied (if necessary) to line that comes down from overhead. It’s a very efficient way to grow.

strawberrry tower

This strawberry tower is a great design — just needs a few more plants.

Garden Works tunnel

A high tunnel, with door decoration by Garden Works youth.

SYGW mural

Seattle Youth Garden Works created a wonderful mural on the end of this high tunnel hoop house. I was tempted to pull down the weeds in front of the mural, but then I saw birds flitting in and out, eating the seed heads. Best to let nature take its course.

pumpkin patch

A beautiful striped pumpkin is getting ripe in the patch.

Peppers and tomatoes

Black plastic is laid between the rows of peppers and tomatoes, increasing the heat for these hot-season crops and reducing the need to weed.

UW Farm sign

A “compost fence” creates a wall for the UW Farm food processing area, and a chalkboard announces the current crops.

Winter Garden Gets Its Blanket

We are having a White Christmas here in Seattle, with a gift to my garden (and me) of a nice blanket of sparkling snow.

Here are images from my garden today.

Merry Christmas!

yard

A Christmas view of our yard from the house.

brroccoli

Broccoli shoots peek out of the snow cover.

cloches

Glass cloches protect young plants from the snow.

cold frames

A plastic cloche covers lettuce, and a double window A-frame covers overwintering beets.

cold frame closer

The beets are tiny and might handle this cold, but I should have put ends on this double-window cold frame for better protection.

big bottle cloche

A big water bottle protects a young cabbage.

yard with cold frames

Cold frames in the background protect greens, but lots of brassicas fend for themselves under the snow.

Cold frames

The big cold frame in the back and the smaller Triangle Tunnel in the front both contain salad greens. I won’t open them until our warmer weather returns, but the tender greens should be fine. Snow is a great insulator!

dino kale

Dinosaur kale is tough!

parsnip

A Christmas stew is going to contain fresh parsnips, pulled today from the snowy ground.

Art Blends with Plants at the NW Flower & Garden Show

Sculptures, fountains and water features blend gracefully in garden landscapes, and the Northwest Flower & Garden Show display gardens showcased inspiring combinations.

Massive fountain

Massive square stones stacked into an imposing fountain, which is skirted by blooming daffodils, greet visitors to the show gardens.

bird scuptures

These steel and wood sculptures pair nicely and seem about to take flight.

patio pavers

The “Good Times Great Food” garden features a varied patio landscaping with an assortment of stone pavers and groundcovers.

bar fountain pool

This bar-fountain-pool combination nicely edges a patio in a small garden.

water scuplture

An artistic water sculpture echoed by another shapely sculpture behind highlights one garden.

espaliered apple

A stylish espaliered tree dresses up this shed wall.

Edible Inspiration on Display at NW Flower & Garden Show

From industrious hydroponic farming to a lot of casual living, the show gardens at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show offered inspiration, ideas and an undeniable hankering for living the good life in the garden.

The big downtown Seattle show runs until Sunday. If you attend on Saturday, don’t miss the fun and educational seminars. I’ll be interviewing restaurateur Tom Douglas and his wife Jackie Cross on their menu-powering Prosser Farm on Saturday at 11:45 a.m.

Here are some images from my visit to the gardens:

hydroponic lettuces

Hydroponically grown lettuces nearly burst from their tubular homes.

hydroponic tubes

Water coursed through plumbing pipe to hydroponically feed this lettuce crop.

A green-roofed shed faces a plastic-covered hoop house filled with hydroponic growing.

Shrunk the farm

“Honey, We Shrunk the Farm” is the title of this edibles-focused garden, highlighted by a whimsical little free library, a low chicken house and a hydroponic growing system in the hoop house.

cultery shed

This tiny house contains lounging space, but the cutlery over the door signals edibles, with strawberries and wheatgrass in planter boxes and pots below bursting with mint.

Garden on Tap

The “Garden on Tap” featured a pub shed with a lit G and plenty of Mason bee houses to pollinate the fruit trees.

beer shed

The shed promises tasty relaxation for the gardener.

Hanami garden

“Hanami – Savoring Spring” by the Arboretum Foundation shows a rural Japanese scene of relaxation under the flowering cherry trees.

Arb garden farmhouse

The front of a Japanese farmhouse in the Arboretum garden, expertly faux painted to show age and texture by my wife Susie Thorness and other volunteer painters.

deer scarer

A Japanese water hammer (aka “deer scarer) sits by the picnic area in the Arobertum’s garden.

Taste Spring at the NW Flower & Garden Show

I can almost taste spring. Can’t you? When a warm wind casts across the yard like a fishing line tossed into a lazy stream, I cast my eyes toward the ground, seeking shoots and sprouts. When they appear, my spirit soars.

.pea shoots

Another way to get that feeling is to visit the giant Northwest Flower & Garden Show–excuse me–Garden Festival being held this week at the Washington State Convention Center in downtown Seattle (blog, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest).

Over the weekend I was in the cavernous show garden area helping set up the Arboretum Foundation’s always-enticing garden, so I’ll give you a tip: brave the crowds, traffic and parking, and come on down. It looks like it is going to be a blooming success.

Here’s another tip: buy your tickets online before 11:55 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 21 and get the early-bird price, $5 off.

Display garden 2016

Giant colored pots lit from within highlighted one of last year’s display gardens.

I’ll be there a few times during the week, and look forward to meeting readers and gardeners. On Wednesday, I present “Eat Your Year: Month-by-Month Actions for Continuous Edibles” at 6:45 p.m. slide snapshot

I’ve mined my garden journal for cultivation and harvest tips throughout the year. You’ll be surprised what can be done in the doldrums of winter, and what needs to be done in the sweetest swell of summer if you want to eat from your yard year round. A book signing follows, and I look forward to personalizing a book for you.

Then on Saturday at 11:45 a.m., I employ my journalism chops by interviewing Seattle’s star restaurateur Tom Douglas and his business partner, wife and chief farmer in the family Jackie Cross. In “The Learning Curve,” we’ll discuss their quest to generate perfect produce for their many restaurants.

If you’ve eaten at Etta’s, Dahlia Lounge, Seatown, Serious Pie, Tanaka San or one of Tom’s other great restaurants in the last few years, you’ve probably eaten produce from Prosser Farm. Six years after breaking ground in the hills west of Prosser, they have learned much (I’ll ask about the rascally rabbits!) and Tom Douglas logonow deliver a significant amount of vegetables for the restaurants from their farm, taking the farm-to-table concept to a wild new level.

Tom will sign copies of his excellent cookbooks after the talk, and I’ll head up to the University Book Store’s booth (#211) to meet and greet and sign my own books for an hour, 1-2 p.m.

You might also find me at my publisher’s booth. The Mountaineers Books and their green living imprint Skipstone will have their books on display and for sale (booth #2354) and will have lots of authors as well as staff to visit with. Learn about recent and upcoming titles, including my next cycling book, Cycling the Pacific Coast: A Complete Guide, Canada to Mexico, which will be out this fall.

I hope you’ll consider attending one or both of my events, but do you realize how much there is to do at the show?

  • Attend one of the 110 seminars and demonstrations going on throughout the show. Besides learning and being entertained, you’ll get to sit down and relax after touring the giant exhibit hall and display gardens.
  • Speaking of which, tour the 22 show gardens for inspiration and that “taste of spring.”
  • Shop at the 350 exhibitors offering garden, nature-related and gourmet food goods in the Garden Marketplace. I especially like the non-profit organizations that offer information and help build our gardening community. I also enjoy touring the Vintage Garden Market to find some rusty old thing that would give my garden a bit more character.

    Windows

    Old windows repurposed into a shed — probably the easiest way to build a cold frame.

  • Snack and sip your way through the Tasting Corner, a new gourmet food and beverage marketplace offered this year. Nearly 30 vendors will offer samples of their tasty wares.

This is the second largest garden festival in the U.S., so plan enough time to enjoy it fully. It’s a great way to get spring underway, even while waiting for those first buds to break.

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