Harvest Visit to UW Farm

Biking by the UW Farm on University of Washington’s east campus this week, I was drawn by a glorious field of colorful chard, so I decided to stop and take a little tour.

UW Farm is a teaching space, and it includes not only UW students but other programs, such as Seattle Youth Garden Works, a program for youth to learn entrepreneurial skills as well as the techniques of growing food.

Here are some harvest images of my visit to the farm.

field of chard

Bright Lights chard, in a glorious field.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes growing the Italian style, trained along a single cord coming from overhead. Productive!

Tomatoes pruned to two stems

The tomatoes are pruned to two main stems, which are then trained and tied (if necessary) to line that comes down from overhead. It’s a very efficient way to grow.

strawberrry tower

This strawberry tower is a great design — just needs a few more plants.

Garden Works tunnel

A high tunnel, with door decoration by Garden Works youth.

SYGW mural

Seattle Youth Garden Works created a wonderful mural on the end of this high tunnel hoop house. I was tempted to pull down the weeds in front of the mural, but then I saw birds flitting in and out, eating the seed heads. Best to let nature take its course.

pumpkin patch

A beautiful striped pumpkin is getting ripe in the patch.

Peppers and tomatoes

Black plastic is laid between the rows of peppers and tomatoes, increasing the heat for these hot-season crops and reducing the need to weed.

UW Farm sign

A “compost fence” creates a wall for the UW Farm food processing area, and a chalkboard announces the current crops.

Charging Into Winter Gardening

If you’ve tackled a big garden project on a hot summer day, you know how fast you can drain your internal batteries. The heat seems to sap it out of me. But as weird as it may seem at the height of summer, right now we should be recharging our garden’s batteries with some new plants for winter.

Peas in a pot

I planted peas in this pot next to my compost pile, and now they’re ready to be moved into the sun and under a trellis.

In the Maritime Northwest, August and early September are great times to plant. I’ll tell you what seedlings I’ve got in pots and in the ground right now, and what you can get from the nurseries in the coming weeks if you don’t want to sprout your own.

If you can start from seed, I recommend it. It’s amazing how quickly seeds will sprout in a summer garden. Parsnips, which are notoriously finicky seeds, sprouted in just four days during one of our recent warm spells. And they came up in such a prolific little forest that I had to get down there and do some serious thinning.

I’ve also started Brussels sprouts, purple sprouting broccoli, beets, carrots, peas and arugula.

Beets

Beets and other seeds will sprout fast in warm summer soil. Be sure to thin to proper spacing. These beets need to be thinned to 4 inches apart.

Of course, with warm days and no rain, I’ve been hand-watering the seedlings to supplement my automatic watering regimen.

What to start now

Greens:

  • Arugula
  • Asian greens (mustards, bok choi, tatsoi, shungiku)
  • Corn salad (aka mache)
  • Cress
  • Endive/radicchio
  • Lettuce (Marvel of Four Seasons, Continuity, Merlot, Red Oak Leaf, Green Deer Tongue, Forellenschluss, Little Gem… so many – plant a rainbow salad!)
  • Swiss chard

Brassicas:

  • Broccoli (fall)
  • Broccoli raab
  • Cauliflower
  • Kohlrabi
  • Kale (choose Lacinato, aka Dinosaur/Palm Tree, the best tasting of all)
Dino kale

The best tasting kale, and very reliable in a mild maritime winter.

Roots:

  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Radish (winter varieties, like Black Spanish)

Alliums:

  • Leeks

More alliums go in later this fall, but you can plan now. Leave space for garlic and shallots.

Seeds or starts?

Most of these plants can be directly sown into the garden, and many of them can now be found as starts in good quality plant nurseries. I always recommend planting root crops only from seed, not transplanting.

If you’re starting from seed and want more control over the plantings, consider starting many of these in pots. It helps you keep a better eye on the seedlings to keep them well watered. You can move a flat of pots into the shade on hot days, or even protect them under some hoops and floating row cover for extra shade and to maintain soil moisture.

greens ready to plant

A flat of salad greens, ready for planting.

When space comes available in the garden and the plants have grown enough to establish hearty roots, you can transplant them. Remember that transplanting in summer is pretty stressful on young plants. Do it on a cooler, cloudy day if you can, and pay extra attention to watering until they’re showing new growth. You can also move the starts to a very large pot and keep them growing there until harvest.

Peas under a trellis

We’ll have plenty of peas for fall. I planted this batch along the house where spring salad greens had been.

More for fall

Also, plan ahead to fill the space when summer vegetables are done. Purchase a supply of cover crop seeds (often sold as a blend, which is a good way to go) and have them on hand to throw down when you pull out the tomatoes, peppers, squash, etc. You can plant a cover-crop blend up until late October.

If you have crops coming out even later, plant fava beans. They can be sown into early November and will reliably sprout in that late-fall cold soil.

Colorful Garden Show Unveils 30th Year

You’ll see plenty of color, crowds and cake at the big Northwest Flower & Garden Festival, going on right now in Seattle. The annual gardening season kickoff turns 30 this year — hence the cake — and fills the Washington State Convention Center — hence the crowds. The opulent show gardens are the big draw — hence the color.

I always enjoy the show gardens, although this year I saw hardly a nod to edibles, which is disappointing. I get it — it is hard to force tomatoes to fruit in winter. But when I see edibles incorporated into the lush landscapes, I am more inspired to imagine elements of the fancy designs into my own garden. Maybe next year.

It’s also great fun to see friends from the gardening world, like other garden writers Lorene Edwards Forkner of Pacific Horticulture or Laura Watson, formerly of Plant Amnesty, who knows more about clematis than I thought any one brain could hold. She’s sharing her expertise at a seminar, another important segment of the event for me — and not just because I’ll be doing the same. If you’re at the show on Sunday, look for my talk “Eat Your Year: Month-by-Month Actions for Continuous Edibles” at 4:15 p.m.

Vendors performing the difficult task of staffing a booth for five long days get my admiration too. I like chatting with Charlie and Carol of Charlie’s Greenhouse, the folks at Diggit and other local tool manufacturers, the always-helpful University Bookstore staff, and the volunteers at the non-profit booths, like aforementioned Plant Amnesty and the Washington Native Plant Society.

Far beyond the colorful gardens, the show is truly a wide-ranging gateway to the gardening year.

Here are images of my day at the show yesterday.

Arboretum garden

The Arboretum Foundation garden showcased plants of the Witt Winter Garden, plus a well-painted arbor and a reproduction of the new loop trail. It opens officially in April.

Chess set

A giant chess set, luxurious grill setup, and sculptural slices of ancient tree trunks combine for this imposing garden.

Beehive gate

This hive-inspired gate, complete with a bee at bottom, welcomes you to the Bee Simple garden.

Bee Simple

An orchard mason bee house sits hopefully next to an espaliered apple tree.

Colorful greenhouse

This show garden’s multi-colored greenhouse, accessed via a floating wooden deck, grabbed me.

Spa Garden

A “spa garden” inspired by Japanese “wabi-sabi” is themed in white.

Vanilla Farm

Orchids and a vanilla vine (in pot on left) surround a funky shed in the tropical Vanilla Farm garden.

Vintage Market

The Vintage Market provides a funky corner to the show.

Plant Amnesty

The Plant Amnesty booth was busy. It’s heartening to see the organization doing well after the tragic loss of its founder, Cass Turnbull, last year.

Ikebana

The ikebana display is always cheery.

Diggit

The folks at Diggit have created another comfortable tool — a hardened stainless steel hori-hori with their signature colorful soft handle.

Useless shovels

Useless shovels. But cool!

Raintree Nursery

Sam Benowitz dispenses wisdom along with edible fruit starts at the Raintree Nursery booth.

Tiny Terrarium

A tiny terrarium sits in the window of the convention center’s skybridge, with Pike Street below and Pike Place Market in the distance.

Opots

These Opots come in striking colors, great to enhance a wall garden.

Bonsai

This Catlin Elm was raised from a cutting by American bonsai forefather John Yoshio Naka, beginning in 1970. Amazing.

Bionic gloves

Colorful hand-painted pots, yes. Bionic gloves? Definitely!

30th dinner party

A 30th dinner party is set in this show garden to celebrate the show’s 30th anniversary. Here’s to 30 more years!

Layer Cake

The festival’s own show garden resembled a layer cake of colorful flowers and plants, enhanced by art-glass candle flames.

Cheers to 30 years, and here’s to 30 more!

Winter Garden Gets Its Blanket

We are having a White Christmas here in Seattle, with a gift to my garden (and me) of a nice blanket of sparkling snow.

Here are images from my garden today.

Merry Christmas!

yard

A Christmas view of our yard from the house.

brroccoli

Broccoli shoots peek out of the snow cover.

cloches

Glass cloches protect young plants from the snow.

cold frames

A plastic cloche covers lettuce, and a double window A-frame covers overwintering beets.

cold frame closer

The beets are tiny and might handle this cold, but I should have put ends on this double-window cold frame for better protection.

big bottle cloche

A big water bottle protects a young cabbage.

yard with cold frames

Cold frames in the background protect greens, but lots of brassicas fend for themselves under the snow.

Cold frames

The big cold frame in the back and the smaller Triangle Tunnel in the front both contain salad greens. I won’t open them until our warmer weather returns, but the tender greens should be fine. Snow is a great insulator!

dino kale

Dinosaur kale is tough!

parsnip

A Christmas stew is going to contain fresh parsnips, pulled today from the snowy ground.

Giving Thanks for My Winter Garden

A miniature forest of salad greens. Chittering songbirds cleaning the remaining bugs off my Lacinato kale trees. Delightful late-blooming flowers. Seedlings protected for winter growth. This is my garden at Thanksgiving.

Calendula flowering

Calendula is still flowering, providing a cheery spot in the garden and in the salad bowl.

Salad greens

Mixed salad greens, including arugula, bok choi, tatsoi, lettuce and Asian mustards are flourishing in this bed, and getting mowed down regularly for salads.

Tatsoi

Tatsoi.

Birds on kale

Sparrows, black-capped chickadees and a rosy finch (obscured, center) gather for a meal of bugs on my Lacinato/palm tree kale.

cabbages and broccoli

Cabbages and broccoli, with one cabbage covered.

Covered cabbage

I’m experimenting with winter growth of a cabbage under cover inside this giant water bottle. There’s another one uncovered right next to it.

cauliflower

Cauliflower setting its head.

Broccoli shoots

This DeCiccio broccoli might yet put on some side shoots.

Broccoli and tunnel

A purple sprouting broccoli and some winter radishes grow in front of a fleece-covered tunnel containing spinach.

Kale and trellis

Lacinato/palm tree kale plants grow against a bamboo trellis which held up cherry tomato plants last summer.

giant collards

Giant walking stick collards are ready to eat.

Pot and apple tree

A pot of spinach covered in garden fleece sits in front of an espaliered Akane apple tree that still has its leaves.

Spinach in pot

Red Kitten spinach grows with seedlings of parlsey and flowers in a pot.

Brussels sprouts kale hybrid

New hybrids of Brussels sprouts and kale promise a harvest of budding florets along the stem.

The first florets coming from the Brussels sprouts/kale hybrid.

Carrots and cold frame

The last of the fall carrot crop sits in front of a cold frame made of two window sashes, wired together. The easy cold frame holds overwintering turnips.

Cover crops

Cover crop of clover, vetch and rye helps build soil on this bed over the winter.

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