Happy Seed Year

“Happy New Year!” When I hear that, seeds come to mind. The new year’s first month is when I plan my garden, fueled by favorite seed catalogs.

In this month’s “Edible Garden” column for Edible Seattle magazine, I offer glimpses into my annual plunge into the seed catalogs. I’ve written about this before in a series on this blog as well–here’s the first one. I took my writing inspiration from Katherine White, whose “Onward and Upward in the Garden” is a funny, perceptive, classic read.

The arrival of colorful seed listings literally whets my appetite, and I dig into my canned veggies and winter garden when browsing the offerings. Sautéed kale pairs quite nicely with down-home Territorial Seeds, while pickled beets (my mother’s recipe) brightens even further the glossy Seed Savers Exchange catalog.

Since Edible Seattle wouldn’t let me take over all their pages to wax poetic about seed companies, I’d like to offer links and comments on a number of favorite catalogs.

SSE's Prickly Caterpillar

Entry for Prickly Caterpillar in the Seed Savers Exchange catalog.

Here are some of our stellar bioregional Pacific Northwest growers:

Adaptive Seeds — They seem to have a little of everything, including a number of tomato varieties unknown to me. Till now, that is.

Bountiful Gardens (a project of Ecology Action) — This is the seed catalog of the non-profit garden educators. Check out their collection of plants that will create habitat and food for beneficial insects, one of founder John Jeavons’ important messages.

Irish Eyes Garden Seeds — What started as potatoes (those Irish eyes!) and garlic has blossomed into a full seed company. But still, check out the spuds!

Kitizawa Seed Co. — They offer the broadest selection of Asian vegetable seeds, which means I can try two or three new mustard or choi varieties. Happy 100th anniversary to the Kitizawa family business!

Resilient Seeds (& Backyard Beans & Grains Project) — Resilient offers a curated list of legumes and grains that grow well in our climate. I’m excited to try their Overwintering Fava, which they say has more tender skin that eliminates the need to peel.

Territorial Seed Co. — The giant in our midst, this full-line vegetable seed company always has a couple of pages of new offerings, as well as nearly all your old favorites.

Uprising Seeds — One of my fave newer companies, Uprising offers a wide variety of seeds, including the Felder cabbage mentioned in my Edible Seattle article that’s going into my garden this year.

Victory Seeds — They focus on rare, open-pollinated and heirloom seeds, a wonderful combination.

Wild Garden Seed — This treasure offers many “farm originals” that have been bred for our region. The catalog also includes an annual essay from Frank Morton, whose Wild Garden Kale mix has become a staple for me. It’s always interesting to see what he’ll come up with next.

 

And here are some valuable companies outside the Northwest:

Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds — With the most amazing print catalog (a real work of art) and a penchant for quirkiness, this company also sells unusual heirloom seeds not found anywhere else.

Botanical Interests — The providers of my recently unearthed gigantic parsnip, this company has a full array of vegetable seeds, sold in beautiful packaging.

Fedco Seed Co. — This Maine-based company focuses on cold-hardy vegetables, which is a good angle for our maritime growing season.

High Mowing Organic Seeds — Serious about organics, this company provides high-quality seeds and sells to commercial growers as well. They grow much of their seed on a 40-acre farm, and have more than 40 new varieties for 2017.

Johnny’s Selected Seeds — Another Maine company, this one 100% employee-owned, was a pioneer nationally in garden seeds.

Seed Savers Exchange — This revered non-profit leads the heirloom seed movement and, through their extensive seed bank, offers thousands of little-known varieties. I urge gardeners everywhere to support this organization as well as to try some of their unique varieties.

I know this is not an exhaustive list (although a bit exhausting, when you pile up all the catalogs on your desk!). If you sell seeds to home gardeners and want to suggest I add you to the list, please contact me.

ps: If you’re crazy about seeds too, come to our Great Seattle Seed Swap at the King County Seed Lending Library. It’s the last Saturday in January in north Seatt.e

Snow Blankets My Winter Garden

I’m a bit late in posting these images, but here are some photos of the snow day we had in Seattle last Thursday, Dec. 8. Up here on Phinney Ridge (about 300 feet above sea level) we got perhaps two inches of snow, which lasted about a day, until the rains returned.

Here’s how my winter vegetables looked under that fluffy white quilt, and one post-snow shot that shows how they fared.

A long tunnel cloche holds salad greens in my front garden.

carrots in cold frame

Carrots tops under the Triangle Tunnel cold frame peek perkily past the plastic.

The Brussels sprout leaves droop but will bounce back. Not so sure about the shungiku flowers behind.

Snowy garden

A plastic cloche holding beets, the Triangle Tunnel protecting carrots, and the unprotected Purple Sprouting broccoli in snow.

Garden after snow

The beets and carrots are fine under their cloches, and the broccoli bounced right back after curling up to protect itself from the cold snap.

Behold the Prince of Parsnips!

Three and a half pounds. That’s the size of one parsnip I wrenched from the garden for a winter dinner. It’s an amaze-your-friends sight.

parsnip whole

Wearing my parsnip-harvest shirt, I cleaned the giant root to prepare for cooking.

A normal parsnip might be a foot long and weigh half a pound. But this one (which, by the way, is the All-American variety from Botanical Interests), at 18 inches long, was also 16 inches wide at its shoulder, which lurked just below the mulched surface, so I didn’t see its girth. When I stuck the garden fork in the ground, I shaved off an edge, not realizing its size.

parsnips and beets

The giant parsnip dwarfs a regular-sized one, and a handful of golf-ball-sized winter beets.

Today it is becoming parsnip soup. Cutting into it crossways (using both hands and significant muscle), I expected a large, woody core, but it’s soft and pulpy all the way through, so we’re using it all.

cut parsnip

Sixteen inches around at its widest spot, but with a soft core that seems edible.

I’ve only just begun to harvest the parsnips, having waited patiently until Thanksgiving to pull the first ones. But with temperatures dropping into the 20s for the last week, I knew they would be getting sweeter, as the plant converts its starch to sugar to counteract the cold. And yes indeed, they are; we roasted the smaller one first, and it was delightful.

So here’s a holiday wish, from my parsnip garden to yours: may your roots run deep and stand strong.

Giving Thanks, 2016

This holiday weekend, the garden is soggy from steady rains. But the day before Thanksgiving yielded a warm, dry spell that got me out amongst the vegetable beds to harvest a bounty for our holiday dinner, and to reflect on the many reasons to be thankful.

Here is my annual photo essay on the joys of year-round gardening.

edible chrysanthemum shungiku

Not much is flowering in the garden right now, but this edible chrysanthemum (also called shungiku) is too cheery to cut!

Redventure celery

Redventure celery provided a bounteous harvest for our Thanksgiving stuffing recipe.

Brussels sprouts

Two tall Roodnerf Brussels sprouts plants yielded enough small- and medium-sized sprouts for a generous side dish, lightly spiced with a fresh onion.

Carrots

Young Chablis Yellow carrots are still brightly growing under my Triangle Tunnel cold frame.

Arugula

Arugula: a reliable winter flower and leafy green to spice up our salads.

Apple

I missed harvesting a small apple high on our Liberty tree, and the cluster of leaves from our unusually warm fall makes that branch remind me of spring.

peppers and parsley

My raised bed cold frame hosted Jimmy Nardello peppers this summer, and some are still alive and turning red amongst a flotilla of parsley leaves.

Black Spanish Radish

This Black Spanish radish, growing large right next to a path, will need to be moved before it sends up its rangy flower head.

Parsnips

Those are All American parsnips under the big floppy leaves, and you can barely see where I pulled three of them for our holiday dinner.

Baby mustard greens

Baby mustard greens are coming in thick under a layer of floating row cover.

Miike Giant mustard

One beautiful leaf from this Miike Giant mustard is enough to spice up a salad or soup.

leek

A stray leek escaped notice among summer plants, and now is full size.

perennial kale

This perennial kale is in its second year and still offering plentiful harvests.

Fava beans

The Broad Windsor fava beans planted on October 30 are poking up cheerily through their protective mulch.

Cabbages

Mystery brassicas: these two volunteers that cropped up among the fall greens are probably cabbages.

Ruby chard

The deep red stems and dusky green leaves of this ruby chard are luxurious among the parsley ground cover.

Purple Sprouting broccoli

The Purple Sprouting broccoli didn’t provide any food for our Thanksgiving meal, but its healthy growth promises early spring abundance.

 

 

Plunge In Pungent Alliums

To paraphrase an old saying: Give a person garlic and they can ward off vampires once; teach a person how to grow garlic, and they will be free of vampires for a lifetime.

Have you planted your garlic yet? I try to get mine in by Halloween, but given our unseasonably warm fall, I think Maritime Northwest gardeners could still get a crop in the ground, unless your garden is in a cold microclimate.

Spanish Roja garlic

Spanish Roja garlic. I save the biggest heads for replanting.

In my Edible Garden column for Edible Seattle’s Sept/Oct issue, I outlined many of the considerations for planting alliums, the genus that includes garlic, onions and shallots. You may still be able to find some of these alliums in nurseries, and all of them would be well worth a try.

Garlic is my favorite, because it comes in so many types and flavors, far more interesting than the typical white supermarket variety. Look for unique varieties that are spicy or sweet, with cloves striped in red or purple. Learn all about types and varieties from Filaree Garlic Farm.

See my earlier article Cloves in Bed, All is Well on the steps to planting garlic.

The onions you’d find now in the nurseries would be seedlings, small groups of grass-like starts growing in soil. Try Walla Walla Sweet, if you can get it, as they do well in our climate.

Seedlings are different from onion sets or bunches, traditionally sold in the spring. Sets are baby onion bulbs that are sold dry, and will come to life and grow after planting. Bunches are small plants that had been started the previous fall and dug from their bed before being banded together and sold by the dozen in the spring.

As we near the end of the gardening year, consider where in your garden these spicy spikes might go, see if you can find any in the nurseries or buy some from a farmers market stand, and get them in the soil as soon as possible.

Cover the soil with a loose mulch like straw to soften the winter rains, and watch for the little allium spikes to break ground early next year, signifying the start of another gardening season. I guarantee that you’ll be vampire-free.

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