Who’s Got Next in 3 Open Beds?

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Who’s Got Next in 3 Open Beds?

I took inventory last weekend and found three spaces in my vegetable garden that are ready for the next crop rotation. Right now, at this crucial time for getting the fall and winter garden going, I have at least that many choices of crops to start.

Lettuce in flower

We had many salads off this lettuce bed, but now it’s regrown and gone to seed. I’ve enjoyed the stately flower stalks, but now it’s time to rotate fall peas into this space.

Space #1: The Garlic Bed

The garlic came out in early July, so this bed has been sitting “fallow” for a few weeks.

Location: The garlic filled the west end of a large bed. It gets good summer sun, but is fairly close to a tree and some bushes, so the lower angle of the winter sun causes part shade.

Strategy: I’ll plant some root crops in succession, starting with beets. It’s a big bed, but I will only plant one short row each for the next few weeks, using different varieties with 50-65 days to maturity. In September, I’ll fill the rest of the bed with carrots for overwintering. The shorter-season beets will be ready by late September, but the longer-season ones will hold in the bed well into winter (with a bit of mulch), getting sweeter with the fall frosts.

Bed prep: Last week I dug a light dusting of complete organic fertilizer into the soil, and covered the bed with a welded-wire mesh so the open soil doesn’t become a cat’s litterbox. Before I plant, I’ll spread an inch of compost on the soil and dig it in.

Since both of these crops are susceptible to flying insect pests laying their eggs on the plants (carrot rust fly and spinach leafminer) , I will cover the entire bed with a floating row cover (FRC). To make it easy to tend and harvest, I’ll set up cloche hoops and stretch the FRC over that. If we get unusually early frosts, I can switch to plastic to protect the plants for winter.

 

Space #2: The Pea Bed

We had a great year for peas, with a harvest longer than normal. The vines just got pulled last week. Annual flowers and some spreading thyme crept in around the pea trellis.

Location: This is a very visible bed right by the main path to my deck.

Strategy: I want Brussels sprouts here. Sprouts are a long-season crop that will not mature until December or January, and I like to have them in a visible spot so I can watch the sprouts develop.

A few weeks ago, I started Brussels sprouts from seed, and the plants are quite small, with just two sets of leaves. I’ll hold them in the pots for another week and then plant them.

When it comes time to plant, I will hedge my bet  by going to the nursery and buying some starts, and will interplant them with the ones I started from seed. That will give me a second variety too.

Bed prep: I’ll pull up the annual flowers (now gone to seed) and dig out the thyme. Since neither the flowers nor the peas are “heavy feeders,” soil fertility in this bed should be fine, so I don’t need to fertilize. But, since brassicas like a rich soil with good water retention, I’ll dig in some compost, which will also boost fertility a bit. I’ll also use FRC over the young plants to ward off the cabbage moth.

 

Space #3: The Salad Bed

This spring I sowed a mixed bed of lettuces and other greens, which produced well and gave us salad from April to mid-June. We enjoyed the buds and flowers of the arugula and mustard greens, but those plants bolted first. Then the lettuce turned bitter, and now the plants have shot up and are going to seed. Since lettuce produces a beautiful large seed head, I’ve been letting them stand in the bed.

Location: This is part of a raised bed off the lawn. The trees have grown up in this area, and with the position of the summer sun, the bed now gets shade about half the day. It gets good winter sun after the deciduous trees have lost their leaves.

Strategy: The part shade should be great for a crop of fall peas. These can be planted through July, so I’ll get them in the ground soon.

Bed prep: To prevent the curious, omnipresent crows from yanking the seedlings out of the ground, I will put a layer of floating row cover over the bed. This should prevent slug attacks too, and will keep the seedbed moist during germination, a key to successful summer planting.

 

Who’s got next?

Well, that’s the plan for three beds and four crops. But there are so many more choices coming: fall salad greens, overwintering kale and sprouting broccoli, Asian winter greens, collards, turnips, kohlrabi, fava beans, cover crops…a long list.

But almost as long is the list of beds that will be free soon: carrot bed, potato bed, onion bed, last-of-the-kale bed, buckwheat cover crop bed, and the quinoa and orach bed. Later, more space will come with the harvest of rutabagas, squash, peppers and tomatoes.

During the height of summer, fall and winter are on my mind. And as I pull out mature crops now, I’m getting more than a summer dinner. I’m getting valuable real estate for the next rotation.

 

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